Spring 2007 Graduate Courses

MI60022-1
The Vulgate and Related Texts
David Ladouceur
T R 11:00 - 12:15P

Introduction to a wide range of texts drawn from Jerome's Vulgate Bible with focus on understanding the peculiarities of this Hebraizing-Hellenizing Latin within its original historical linguistic context. No knowledge of Greek or Hebrew required. Special emphasis on the Book of Psalms which will be carefully read along with modern and ancient Christian commentaries including Augustine's Ennarrationes in Psalmos.

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MI60120-1
Identity and Agency in the Reign of King Alfred
Katherine O’Brien O'Keeffe
T R 9:30 - 10:45A

A close examination of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts of the late 800s.

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MI60148-1
Major Ricardian Poets
Kathryn Kerby-Fulton
T 3:30 - 6:00P

A close examination of the selected Old English and Middle English prose, with particular emphasis on manuscript construction and collaboration.

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MI60160-1
The Pearl Poet
Dolores Frese
T R 2:00 - 3:15P

A study of the works of the Pearl Poet.

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MI60212-1
The Age of Charlemagne
Thomas Noble
M W F 10:40 - 11:30A

The Carolingian (from Carolus, Latin for Charles: Charles the Great--Charlemagne--was the most famous Carolingian) period, roughly the eighth and ninth centuries, was foundational for western Europe. But this was also the time when the mid-Byzantine Empire consolidated its position and when the Abbasid family of caliphs introduced important and durable changes in the Islamic world. This course will focus on the West in the age of Charlemagne, but will draw frequent comparisons with and make continuous reference to Europe's Byzantine and Islamic neighbors. The course will explore such themes as: Europe's Roman and Christian inheritances from antiquity; the peoples of the Carolingian world; kingship and empire; political and social institutions and ideologies; religious and secular law; war and diplomacy; agriculture and trade; the church--popes, bishops, monks, and nuns; theology; art and architecture; Latin and vernacular literature. Reading assignments will combine modern scholarship and primary sources (in translation). Students will write mid-term and final examinations and will choose between several short papers or one long paper. Graduate students will meet weekly with the professor, carry out reading assignments different from those of the undergraduates, and submit a series of short papers.

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MI60279-1
Medieval Legal History
Robert Rodes
W 8:00 - 10:00P

Studies the formative period of the Anglo-American legal system using 14th-century yearbooks and other materials from the same period.

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MI60462-1
The Jewish-Christian Debate in the High Middle Ages
Michael Signer
T R 12:30 - 1:45P

The growth of urban centers in Europe and Iberia during the Middle Ages rekindled the literary debates between Jews and Christians that began in the Early Church. Both Jews and Christians constructed images of the Other that were grounded in earlier arguments from Scripture and augmented them with the new tools of reason and linguistic knowledge. Our seminar will read both Jewish and Christian documents analyzing them in light of the work of modern historians such as Gilbert Dahan, Jeremy Cohen, David Berger, and Gavin Langmuir. In addition to reading disputation literature, we shall analyze papal policy, noble patronage, and canon law.

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MI60536-1
Lyric Poetry of Renaissance
Jo Ann Della Neva
R 3:30 - 6:15P

An in-depth study of the oeuvre of one or two poets (e.g., Du Bellay), including non-amatory poetry.

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MI60553-1
Dante II
Christian Moevs
T R 9:30 - 10:45A

An in-depth study, over two semesters, of the entire Comedy, in its historical, philosophical and literary context, with selected readings from the minor works (e.g., Vita Nuova, Convivio, De vulgari eloquentia). Lectures and discussion in English; the text will be read in the original with facing-page translation. Students may take one semester or both, in either order.

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MI60633-1
Medieval Latin Texts
Anna Taylor
M W F 3:00 - 3:50P

A survey of Medieval Latin Texts, designed to introduce intermediate students to medieval Latin literature and to help them progress in translation skills.

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MI60635-1
Creation and Time in Augustine
Sabine MacCormack
W 1:30 - 4:00P

In his youth, Augustine (354-430 AD) received an excellent education in the Latin classics, the benefits of which remained with him throughout his life. Later, he also read philosophical writings, and, after his conversion, works by Christian authors. The book he quoted most frequently was the Bible. From his childhood, Augustine was endowed with a most unusual ability to ask awkward questions. Initially targeting his teachers, he later addressed his questions to the authors whose books he read, and to God. His writings therefore tend to take a dialogic form where the interlocutors include not only the reader but God, and-among human beings-Cicero, Vergil and other Romans, and also Augustine's Christian contemporaries, including Jerome, Paulinus of Nola and Count Marcellinus to whom he addressed the City of God. In following these dialogues, we will read not just Augustine's best known writings (Confessions and City of God) but also his commentaries on Genesis, and some of his letters and sermons. The purpose is to arrive at an understanding of Augustine's ideas about creation and time, and about the nature of human society and its goals. We will also ask what can be learnt from Augustine's dialogic and sometimes disputatious way of thinking, explaining and debating. Almost all of Augustine's writings have been translated into English, but obviously, an ability to read Latin will be most useful.

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MI63283-1
Heresy and Dissent in the Middle Ages
John Van Engen
T 7:00 - 9:30P

Over the past generation heresy and dissent has represented one of the most active fields of medieval historical research. This course aims to accomplish two ends. It will introduce students to the interpretative literature broadly and to selected famous cases by way of reading extensively in English and other modern languages. It will also, in the nature of a seminar, read intensively in selected primary sources involving two cases, the so-called Spiritual Franciscans and the Lollards. The goal is to practice research and interpretation on the basis of selected texts. This means Latin, and Middle English. Students will write a major research paper to complete the course.

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MI63303-1
History of Medieval Philosophy
Stephen Dumont
T R 5:00 - 6:15P

A semester long course focusing on the history of medieval philosophy. It provides a more indepth consideration of this period than is allowed in PHIL 30301, Ancient and Medieval Philosophy and may be considered a follow-up to that course.

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MI63402-1
Historical Theology Seminar: Medieval Theology
Joseph Wawrykow
R 9:30 - 12:15P

Seminar on a selected theological topic in the medieval period.

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MI 66020 Directed Readings (for Graduate Students)
Various Instructors
By arrangement

Offers students a possibility, normally in their second or third year, to work closely with a professor in preparing a topic mutually agreed upon. Student and professor must sign a form that records the readings.

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MI 67002 2nd-Year Research Tutorial II
Various instructors
By arrangement

Second-year graduate students in medieval studies produce a substantial, original research paper based on the intensive program of reading in primary sources (preponderantly in the original language) and scholarly literature undertaken with a teacher in the previous semester. Alternatively, by permission of the Medieval Institute’s director, students may use the tutorial to expand and polish a paper prepared originally for a previous research seminar.

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MI67020-1
Editing Medieval Manuscripts
Emery Kent
M 2:00 - 5:00P

In this course, students will be introduced to the principles and basic procedures involved in editing later medieval Latin texts from manuscripts: the reading and transcription of manuscripts, the collation of manuscripts, the preparation of an apparatus criticus and a apparatus fontium, the presentation of critically edited texts in print, etc. Students will learn the importance of paleographic, codicological, philiological, and historical-bibliographical analysis in critical editions executed according to the "historical method." By reference to exemplary critical editions of later medieval Latin works, students will also be introduced to hermeneutical issues involved in editing. Moreover, students will be introduced to the techniques, sources and instruments of primary research among the manuscripts, and will prepare a term-long heuristic project. Having passed the Medieval Institute Latin examination (or some equivalent) is a prerequisite for enrolling in the course; any exceptions to the prerequisite must be approved by the teacher, after consultation with him.

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77001 Field Examination Preparation
Thomas Noble
By arrangement

Offers students a possibility, normally in their second or third year, to work closely with a professor in preparing for one of their field examinations.

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77002 Dissertation Proposal Preparation
Thomas Noble
By arrangement

Offers students the opportunity to work with their adviser in preparing their dissertation proposal.

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88001 Research and Dissertation
Thomas Noble
By arrangement

Independent research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

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88002 Nonresident Dissertation Research
Thomas Noble
By arrangement

Required of nonresident graduate students who are completing their theses in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.

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