Notice Board

Below are links to information submitted by medievalist colleagues both in and outside the Notre Dame community. These are provided as a general service and not as as a comprehensive list. Periodically, outdated postings will be deleted, but readers are encouraged to check deadline information carefully.

Fellowship/Job Announcements

Calls for Papers (Conferences)

Calls for Submissions (Journals)

Conference Announcements

Miscellaneous Announcements


Fellowship/Job Announcements

Study in Greece during 2022-2023 with American School of Classical Studies at Athens Programs and Fellowships

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens was founded in 1881 to provide American graduate students and scholars a base for their studies in the history and civilization of the Greek world. Today it is still a teaching institution, providing graduate students a unique opportunity to study firsthand the sites and monuments of Greece. The School is also a superb resource for students and senior scholars pursuing research in many fields ranging from prehistoric to modern Greece, thanks to its internationally renowned libraries, the Blegen, focusing on all aspects of Greece from its earliest prehistory to late antiquity, and the Gennadius, which concentrates on the medieval to modern Greek world, as well as the Malcolm H. Wiener Laboratory for Archaeological Sciences.

FUNDING FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS FOR STUDY AT THE ASCSA (FULL ACADEMIC YEAR AND SUMMER PROGRAMS)

REGULAR MEMBER FELLOWSHIPS: Fellowships are available for the School’s Regular Members. Fellowships provide a stipend of $11,500 plus room and board at Loring Hall on the School grounds and waiver of School fees. Regular Member fellowships are awarded for the entire nine-month program. All awards are made on the recommendation of the Committee on Admissions and Fellowships and are based on the results of the qualifying examinations and materials submitted with the application.
Fellowships include two in archaeology, one each in history and literature, and nine unrestricted as to field. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

STUDENT ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP: For advanced graduate students who plan to pursue independent 9-month (Sept. to May) research projects and do not wish to commit to the full Regular Program. DEADLINE: ROLLING

ADVANCED FELLOWSHIPS: Several fellowships for the full academic year at the ASCSA with a stipend of $11,500 plus room and board at Loring Hall, and waiver of School fees are available to students who have completed the Regular Program or one full academic year as a Student Associate Member and plan to return to the School to pursue independent research, usually for their Ph.D. dissertations. Advanced Fellowships fields awarded by the School include one each in art and architecture of antiquity, history of architecture, Mycenaean archaeology or Athenian architecture and/or archaeology, and the study of pottery; and three unrestricted as to field. DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 15, 2022.

FULBRIGHT FELLOWSHIPS:  Visit the Fulbright website for fellowship details and stipend information. Applicants for a Fulbright Fellowship in Greece to be held in affiliation with the ASCSA, must request a letter from the ASCSA for affiliation. Applications for a letter of affiliation must be submitted at least two weeks before the applicant’s institutional deadline.
Simultaneous application to both the Fulbright and the ASCSA is required. Candidates must submit the ASCSA application by the due date for the Fulbright application. DEADLINE: OCTOBER 12, 2021.

WIENER LABORATORY PRE-DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP 2023-2025
Two-year funding for individuals actively enrolled in a graduate program who have passed all qualifying exams and have an approved Ph.D. proposal pursuing archaeological research related to the ancient Greek world at the Wiener Laboratory. Stipend of $20,000 for 12 months. Call for applications will open fall 2022.

MEDIEVAL GREEK SUMMER SESSION AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY, SUMMER 2023: Graduate students and professors in any field of late antique, post-antique, Byzantine or medieval studies at any university worldwide. Month-long program in intermediate level Medieval Greek language and philology at the Gennadius Library, with site and museum trips. Up to twelve scholarships available. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2023.

SUMMER SESSION: Six-week session to explore the sites and museums in Greece for graduates, undergraduates, and secondary school and college teachers. Fee of $4,900 includes tuition, travel within Greece, room and partial board, and museum and site fees. Scholarships available. DEADLINE: JANUARY 7, 2022.

SUMMER SEMINARS: Two 18-day sessions designed for those who wish to study specific topics in Greece and visit major monuments with exceptional scholars as study leaders, and to improve their understanding of the country’s landscape, archaeology, material culture, history, literature, and culture. Enrollment is open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students, and to high school and college instructors of classics and related subjects. Fee of $2,750 includes tuition, travel within Greece, room, partial board in Athens, and museum and site fees. Scholarships available. DEADLINE: JANUARY 7, 2022.

FUNDING FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS AND POSTGRADUATES FOR STUDY AT THE ASCSA (FULL ACADEMIC YEAR)

JACOB HIRSCH FELLOWSHIP: For projects carried out in Greece; eligibility is limited to U.S. or Israeli citizens, Ph.D. candidate writing a dissertation or recent Ph.D. (not more than five years since the awarding of the Ph.D.) revising a dissertation for publication. A stipend of $11,500 plus room and board at Loring Hall, and waiver of School fees. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

KATHRYN AND PETER YATRAKIS FELLOWSHIP: Ph.D. candidates and recent Ph.D.s (within the last 5 years), of any nationality, for work in the Gennadius Library for the full academic year. Stipend of $11,500 plus room and board at Loring Hall, and waiver of School fees.  DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

M. ALISON FRANTZ FELLOWSHIP: Ph.D. candidates and recent Ph.D.s (not more than five years since the awarding of the Ph.D.) for work in the Gennadius Library. A stipend of $11,500 plus room and board at Loring Hall, and waiver of School fees. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

SCHWARZ FELLOWSHIP AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY FOR RESEARCH ON MUSIC: Career musicians, or researchers who are either currently Ph.D. candidates or have received their Ph.D. within the last 5 years, of any nationality, engaged in research on music that focuses on cultural interactions in the Mediterranean world broadly defined. Stipend of $11,500 plus room and board at Loring Hall, and waiver of School fees. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

SCHWARZ FELLOWSHIP AT THE GENNADIUS LIBRARY FOR RESEARCH ON URBAN ARCHITECTURE: Ph.D. candidates or recent Ph.D.s (within the last 5 years), of any nationality, engaged in research on architecture, urban planning, and the history of the built environment in Greece from 1821 to the present. Stipend of $11,500 plus room and board at Loring Hall, and waiver of School fees. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

FUNDING FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS OR POSTGRADUATES FOR STUDY AT THE ASCSA (SHORT-TERM FELLOWSHIPS)

ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF AMERICA (AIA) ANNA C. AND OLIVER C. COLBURN FELLOW:  Ph.D. candidates or recent Ph.D. (not more than five years since the awarding of the Ph.D.) whose field is classical archaeology. Visit the Archaeological Institute of America website for more information. Simultaneous application to both the AIA and the ASCSA is required. Two fellowships of $5,500 each. Fellowship granted in even years. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

COTSEN TRAVELING FELLOWSHIP FOR RESEARCH IN GREECE:  Short-term travel award of $2,000 for senior scholars and graduate students for projects and research at the Gennadius Library. At least one month of residency required. School fees are waived. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

HARRY BIKAKIS FELLOWSHIP: North American or Greek graduate students researching ancient Greek law or Greek graduate students working on a School excavation. A stipend of $1,875. School fees are waived. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

HENRY S. ROBINSON CORINTH RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP: Awarded to pre- or post-doctoral scholars for research on a dissertation or primary publication specifically on Corinth, requiring the use of the resources, archaeological site, and collections at the ASCSA excavations at Ancient Corinth. Open to all nationalities. One or more grants for up to three months, maximum amount of stipend is $4,000. School fees are waived. Granted every other year. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

WIENER LABORATORY RESEARCH ASSOCIATE APPOINTMENTS: Short-term funding for Ph.D. candidates and postdoctoral scholars from colleges and universities worldwide pursuing archaeological research related to the ancient Greek world at the Wiener Laboratory. Variable amounts up to $7,000. Term variable, up to nine months. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

WILLIAM SANDERS SCARBOROUGH FELLOWSHIPS: For up to three months in residence to carry out proposed research projects, to join the School’s academic programs (field trips and seminars during the regular academic year or the summer, excavations at the Agora or Corinth, scientific field schools, etc.), and/or to develop knowledge, resources, and collegial networks to enhance their teaching. Open to Graduate students, faculty members (K-12 and all levels of post-secondary education), and independent scholars residing in the United States or Canada, regardless of citizenship, whose geographic origin, diverse experiences, and socio-economic background are underrepresented at the School (including persons from the Black, Indigenous, and Persons of Color communities), and whose studies, research, or teaching would benefit from residency at the School. Fellowship recipients need not be specialists in the field of Classical Studies. DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

TRAVELING AND EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIPS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS AND POSTGRADUATE STUDY

COULSON/CROSS AEGEAN EXCHANGE: Program of the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC):  Short-term fellowships for Greek nationals and scholars to pursue research in Turkey under the auspices of the American Research Institute in Turkey (ARIT). Stipend of $250 per week plus up to $500 for travel expenses. Submit online application to ASCSA. DEADLINE: MARCH 15, 2022.

MULTI-COUNTRY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS, Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC): Ph.D. candidates and postdoctoral scholars with research in the humanities, social sciences, or allied natural sciences requiring travel to several countries with an American overseas research center. Consult CAORC website for application and deadline: www.caorc.org.

PAUL REHAK MEMORIAL TRAVELING FELLOWSHIP: Regular members and Student Associate members in attendance at the ASCSA for the entire academic year. Maximum grant of $1,000 or lesser amounts. School fees are waived. The purpose is to allow individuals to travel in Greece and Italy to conduct a research project during the current academic year from September 1, 2021 to July 1, 2022. Compensation for travel that transpired during the prior fall and winter terms or planned for the spring term of the 2021-2022 academic year will be considered. DEADLINE: MARCH 1, 2022.

FUNDING FOR SENIOR SCHOLARS FOR STUDY AT THE ASCSA

KRESS PUBLICATIONS FELLOWSHIPS: Postdoctoral scholars working on assigned material from excavations at Ancient Corinth, the Athenian Agora, Lerna, and affiliated projects of the ASCSA to support research for publication of excavated material. Grants for at least three months (up to $10,000) to a maximum of nine months (up to $30,000). DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2022.

WIENER LABORATORY POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP 2023-2026
Three-year funding for individuals who have received their Ph.D. within the last seven (7) years pursuing archaeological research related to the ancient Greek world at the Wiener Laboratory. Stipend of $35,000 for 12 months. Call for applications will open fall 2022.

WIENER LABORATORY PROGRAMMATIC POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP FOR 2024-2027: Three-year funding for individuals who have received their Ph.D. and have a demonstrable record of research and publication directly relevant to the project. Eligibility limited to any archaeological project affiliated with the ASCSA, current and former permit holders. Stipend of $35,000 for 12 months. Call for applications will open fall 2023.

For more information about each program or fellowships, please visit http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/


Calls for Papers (Conferences)

21st Vagantes Conference on Medieval Studies

The 21st Vagantes Conference on Medieval Studies invites abstracts from current graduate students and recently graduated Masters students from all disciplines on any topic that is related to the long Middle Ages. We encourage proposals for innovative presentations (20 minutes) and lecture-performances (25 minutes) on the global medieval, non-Eurocentric geographies, and medievalism(s). 

Vagantes is a multidisciplinary conference, therefore please provide a clear summary of your proposed paper using language that is accessible to non-specialists. Anonymized submissions will be reviewed by a panel of graduate students. 

An award(s) will be given for the best paper(s)! Papers must be submitted in advance to be considered for the prize. For more information see: vagantesconference.org/conference-information-2021/paper-prize. 

Submission Requirements

Abstracts of 300 words with paper title and a 1–2 page CV (including applicant’s preferred name and pronouns) in one PDF are due Monday, November 29th, 2021 to vagantesboard@gmail.com

Location

The conference will take place in-person at the Cleveland Museum of Art and Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio from March 24th–26th, 2022. The event will be moved online pending Covid-19 pandemic conditions. 

ADA Accommodations

Vagantes is committed to providing equal access to all conference activities in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and CWRU policy. Please contact us if you require specific accommodations. 

Authorial Publishing in the Middle Ages, c.400–1500

18–19 July 2022, Jesus College, Oxford, UK


Textual transmission relies on the fact of ‘publication’, inherent in the authorial
process. With no appreciation of the act of publishing, our understanding of any
authorial work from any period will remain defective. But what does ‘publishing’
mean in the context of a manuscript culture, in which books were copied slowly and
singly by hand? What did it mean to ‘publish’ a new work in the Middle Ages? This
conference will explore the strategies by which medieval authors sought to obtain
audiences for their works.


We invite proposals for pertinent discussions from a variety of perspectives. Focuses
may include, but are not limited to, networks by which authors circulated their works,
literary devices to attract potential readers, and the material evidence of publication
such as autographs and their primary copies. Also, papers on authors who published
their works both in manuscript and print are welcome.


Papers should be 20 minutes in length. Please submit a proposal of no more than 250
words to Samu Niskanen (samu.niskanen@helsinki.fi), to be received by 10 October
2021.


Professor Daniel Hobbins (Notre Dame) and Professor Daniel Wakelin (Oxford) will
read keynotes.


The conference is funded by the ERC project Medieval Publishing from c.1000 to
1500 and the Academy of Finland project Authorial Publication in Early Medieval
Europe, c.400–1000. Speakers will be entitled to accommodation in college (three
nights, 17–20 July), with lunches on Monday and Tuesday. There will be a conference
dinner on Monday. Travel costs are not covered.


This conference has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC)
under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant
agreement No 716538).

CALL FOR PAPERS: Conference on Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy

Conference at the University of Illinois at Chicago

March 7-8, 2022 **NEW DATE**

Keynote Speakers:

  • Sari Nusseibeh, Professor of Philosophy and former President, Al-Quds University
  • Sarah Stroumsa, Alice and Jack Ormut Professor of Arabic Studies, Hebrew University

General Description:

Medieval Jewish philosophy was intertwined with Islamic philosophy, and thinkers in the two traditions shared interests and challenges.  A rootedness in Greek antiquity, an attempt to work out the metaphysical implications of monotheism, a fascination with Aristotle, and a concern for the place of law in religious commitment belong prominently among their many shared interests.  A running critique by co-religionists who regarded ancient Greek philosophy as inimical to their religious tradition belongs prominently among their shared challenges.  The Jewish-Muslim Initiative at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) proposes a conference to explore these topics, and to consider whether these medieval thinkers can continue to illuminate Judaism and Islam today.  We welcome papers from philosophers, historians and theologians, at all stages of their careers;  we would particularly like to include some graduate students.

Logistics:

The conference will be held at the campus of UIC on March 7-8, 2022.  There will be 10 or 11 spots for submitted papers. All papers will have about 30 minutes for presentation and 30 minutes for discussion.

Themes:

Papers comparing specific Jewish and Muslim figures are welcome, as are papers on general philosophical or theological themes that appear in both Jewish and Muslim thought, or papers on the historical context for the intellectual encounter of Jews and Muslims in the medieval period.  We welcome in addition scholars interested in pursuing how the resources of Jewish and Muslim medieval thought, or the encounter between Jews and Muslims in that period, can be used to address philosophical and theological concerns in the present day.

Applying:

Those interested in participating should submit an abstract of 500-750 words and a current C.V. to Junaid Quadri (jquadri@uic.edu) or Sam Fleischacker (fleischert@sbcglobal.net) by October 15. Word or PDF file formats only. Please prepare abstracts for anonymous review.

Notification will be made by November 15 at the latest. If your abstract is selected, we will cover your accommodation and meals at the conference.  We expect also to be able to cover travel expenses for 2 or 3 participants (graduate students will be favored for this.)


Calls for Submissions (Journals)

 


Conference Announcements   

The 17th John V. Kelleher Lecture at Harvard University

“Ancestors, gods and genealogies”

Ruairí Ó hUiginn: School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies

October 7th, 2021 from 3:00-5:00 PM.

This lecture will be delivered online. Register in advance here.

Inaugural Thalia Potamianos Annual Lecture on the Impact of Greek Culture

The Gennadius Library of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens invites you to the inaugural Thalia Potamianos Annual Lecture Series on the Impact of Greek CultureDr. Peter Frankopan, Professor of Global History and Stavros Niarchos Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research at Oxford University, will present the first of his three-part series of lectures, "Global Greece: A History," on Thursday, October 7, 2021, in Cotsen Hall at the American School's campus in Athens.

Subsequent lectures will be presented in the United States in 2022. All lectures will also be livestreamed on the School's website at this link.

 


Miscellaneous Announcements

 

Hill Museum & Manuscript Library’s online vHMML Museum goes live

Full announcement

California Rare Book School: History of the Book, Live Online

The History of the Book, a freely available course book based materials in UCLA’s Special Collections is now live online: http://hob.gseis.ucla.edu

The project is meant to be a pedagogical resource—serving as an introductory overview, but also, as an ongoing project of classes taught in the Information Studies Department. Students will be invited to contribute to the project over time, building an extensive resource for study in this field as well as aggregation of resources for research. Chapters can be printed as pdf or read online. Exhibits exist only online.

The History of the Book is a networked resource focused on the production and reception of materials related to the history of the book and literacy technologies, broadly conceived. This ongoing project is being developed by Professor Johanna Drucker, working with staff and students based at UCLA to provide an online environment for research and learning. The project is pedagogical in its aims, but also, in its method. Some of the exhibit materials were developed by students in the MLIS program in Information Studies at UCLA, and some by faculty or research scholars. We have partners in other institutions, and welcome queries and contributions to the development of this site ahead. In this beta version, we are introducing three exhibits and an outline for what will be a coursebook for an introductory series of lessons. We have made every effort to proof and check the content, but if you find errors of fact or judgment, we would very much appreciate your contacting us with suggestions for correction.

Authority and Innovation in Early Franciscan Thought (c. 1220-45)
Grant Agreement 714427-INNOVATION
January 1, 2017- December 31, 2021

‘Authority and Innovation in Early Franciscan Thought (c. 1220-45)’ (short-titled ‘INNOVATION’) is a 5-year research project that is funded by the European Research Council, the research funding body of the European Union. The director (‘Principal Investigator’) of the project is Dr Lydia Schumacher, who is based in the Department of Theology & Religious Studies at King’s College London. Her research staff includes Dr. Dominique Poirel and Dr Ana Irimescu, who are based at the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Paris, France.

The research team welcomes inquiries from those with interests in the early Franciscan intellectual tradition or any matter related to it. There are a variety of options for getting involved with the project or keeping updated on the team’s research.

For the schedule of workshops and full announcement, see the PDF flyer.  Contact Lydia Schumacher with any questions.

The Project Team: Writing Culture in Southern German Women's Convents

'Writing Culture in Southern German Women's Convents' was the focus of a project funded from September 2008 until May 2012 by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) as part of its action plan on 'Libraries and Archives in Cooperation with Research'. This programmatic new approach made possible the cataloguing, digitisation and academic study of medieval manuscripts and early printed books as well as of pragmatic documents and archival records from five selected southern German women's convents.

Jointly organised by the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich and the Bayerisches Hauptstaatsarchiv, the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität in Münster / Heinrich-Heine-Universität in Düsseldorf, the project studied the medieval books of these Bavarian convents and their archival holdings (until 1550) and now presents them embedded in their historical context. The manuscripts, archival records and incunables created or formerly owned by the Dominican sisters of Altenhohenau, the Bridgettines of Altomünster, the Poor Clares (St. Jakob am Anger) and Franciscan Tertiaries (Pütrichhaus) of Munich and the Benedictines of Neuburg an der Donau allowed systematic insights into the convent libraries, economic management and the particular roles of office holders. More broadly the project offered new perspectives on the education, internal organisation and the self-conception of these religious communities.

After the dissolution of these houses the historical records were divided up and as a result, books and documents are today preserved in libraries as well as in archives. It was therefore crucial to bring them back together under an overall perspective. Through a synthesis of the source material, the rich heritage of these often highly-educated women and their engagement with literature can be assessed and presented in an unprecedented way, within the wider context of these politically and economically influential communities.

When the project expired, the project partner provided in-house effort for the publication of the results. The documents have been recently made accessible online as well as in a printed catalogue.

A thematic research archive hosted by the Bayerische Landesbibliothek Online offers introductory texts and an overview of the mediaeval holdings,structured by subject groups based on mediaeval ways of organising libraries and knowledge, to allow comparisons, despite the different quantity of sourcematerial from each convent. Links provide direct access to the digitised manuscripts, early printed books, documents and archival records. Manuscript descriptions are available online.

The printed catalogue contains introductory material and detailed descriptions of the manuscripts from two of the convents as well as an overview of the printed material:
Katalog der lateinischen Handschriften der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek München. Die Handschriften aus den Klöstern Altenhohenau und Altomünster: Clm 2901-2966 sowie Streubestände gleicher Provenienz, Anja Freckmann, Juliane Trede and Elisabeth Wunderle, eds, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2016.

Melanie Hömberg's study of the economic practices of the female communities, 'Economic Book Keeping in Context', is available on the homepage through a link. Almut Breitenbach's publications are listed in the bibliography.

Digitisation

Three 8-9th C. Irish manuscripts have recently been digitised and the images provided free online. The work is part of the Early Irish Manuscripts Project at Trinity College Dublin. 

At the end of the first paragraph in each of the following descriptive webpages, there is a link to the digitized manuscript images:

1.   Garland of Howth (TCD MS 56):

2.   Book of Mulling (TCD MS 60): 

3.   Book of Dimma (TCD MS 59):

The Early Irish MS Project is currently digitising the Codex Usserianus Primus (TCD MS 55). You can read more about that here.

Medieval Academy Newsletter

News items can be read on the MAA blog.

Facsimile of Moore Bede Released

ISAS colleagues will be pleased to know that Cambridge University Library has released a full digital facsimile of the Moore Bede (CUL Kk.5.16) which is — almost certainly — the earliest copy of Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum made not so very long after Bede's death in 735. 

The direct link to the facsimile is here: http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/view/MS-KK-00005-00016/1 

Digitization project

Codex Eyckensis and a 10th century Gospel Book digitized by the Museums Department of Maaseik in Belgium
Press Release: Codex Eyckensis

The Sciola Grant for Research in Italy

Sponsored by the Diana M. Sciola Endowment for Excellence to support research on Catholic Tradition and Italian Artistic Culture

The Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts (ISLA) invites those undergraduates and graduate students in all Arts and Letters disciplines whose research interests address the impact of Catholic traditions upon Italian artistic culture to submit proposals to the Sciola Grant Program.  In order to be eligible for funding, research must take place in Italy. The Sciola Family Endowment supports projects that study the various ways in which the Catholic tradition has influenced the visual arts, theatre, architecture, fashion, music, cinema, literature, design, culinary arts and photography throughout the ages. 

A double-spaced, 3-page proposal, budget, and a letter of recommendation are required of both undergraduates and graduates. Proposals should make clear the connection between Catholic tradition and the artistic expression under study.

For details concerning the submission of applications as well as post-grant requirements, see UROP Proposal Requirements for Academic Year & Summer Submissions. Undergraduates must upload their application materials to UrApply  (including health form and parental consent); graduate students should email their completed applications, along with a Sciola Grant Proposal Cover Sheet, to Therese Blacketor

See Grant Post-Award Requirements for the required final report guidelines.

Maximum award $2,500. Proposals accepted on a rolling basis.

Loveden Hill Urn 3D model now online

Colleagues with research and teaching interests in early Old English, runeology, material culture, archaeology, or digital humanities, may be interested in a small project on the Loveden Hill cremation urn which has just been completed by colleagues in Leicester and Nottingham (Martin Findell), with Dominic Powlesland (The Landscape Research Centre) and the generous support of the Trustees of the British Museum and the Museum's Department of Britain, Europe and Prehistory. 

Using digital photogrammetry, Dominic has created a dynamic 3D model of this 6th C cremation urn, which carries one of the earliest examples of written Old English, in runic script. The module is hosted on the British Museum's Sketchfab site and is free and accessible to all. You can view it at 3 resolutions, (LD, SD, HD – low, standard, high), and the files are small enough for you to view it in HD on your mobile phone (something to impress even your high-tech students). Annotations have been provided, but you can switch these off using the tools in the lower right hand corner of the screen.

The short URL to the site is here: https://skfb.ly/IYCq 

The model allows you to rotate the pot, as if you were holding it – which is what you need to do to read the inscription, and – indeed – to have written it in the first place. The model should therefore enable a more sophisticated contextual analysis of the inscription than hitherto possible, alongside the linguistic and graphic analysis of the runes (indeed, this will form part of Martin Findell's forthcoming book, arising from his Impact of Diasporas project). The potential of this type of technology for creating and sharing research and teaching tools is plain to see.   

Dominic, Martin and I have written a blog for those of you interested in the methods used to create the model, and for more information about the pot and the inscription. This can be found on the LRC website: http://www.landscaperesearchcentre.org/wp/?p=92 . Here you can also download two PDF files. These contain scaleable, dynamic versions of the model, so that you can measure it, create cross sections, and use the model off-line.

Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources now freely available online

The project is delighted to announce that the text of the DMLBS has been made available under license to the Logeion project hosted by the University of Chicago and is now accessible via the Logeion interface at http://logeion.uchicago.edu/.

The Logeion interface, which does not require a subscription of any kind, allows searching of all its many dictionaries by headword. (More advanced forms of searching across the DMLBS text are available via the subscription-based Brepolis.net platform.) We very much hope that this new way of accessing the dictionary will be appreciated by medieval scholars across the world. We would, of course, encourage users nevertheless to buy a copy of the printed dictionary as well!

Newberry Library French Renaissance Paleography Project now online

A self-help tool that provides integrated access to an archive of historically significant, visually captivating manuscripts held in the collection of the Newberry Library and other North American repositories. Via interactive maps, faceted browsing, and keyword searches, users can explore more than 100 French manuscript documents written between 1300 and 1700, page through a dozen historical calligraphy books, view a half-dozen historical maps, practice transcribing the documents, and more. 

https://paleography.library.utoronto.ca/ 

British Library

Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts Digitisation Master List (1429 items) now online : http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/files/bl-amem-digitised-manuscripts-master-list.pdf