Notice Board

Included below are links to information submitted by medievalist colleagues outside the Notre Dame community. They include:

Fellowship/Job Announcements

Calls for Papers (Conferences)

Calls for Submissions (Journals)

Conference Announcements

Miscellaneous Announcements

These off-campus opportunities have come “over the transom” and our list does not represent any comprehensive attempt at inclusivity. These postings are provided as a general service, per the request of the issuing entities to circulate this information. Periodically, outdated postings will be deleted, but readers are encouraged to check deadline information carefully. 


FELLOWSHIP/JOB ANNOUNCEMENTS

Heckman Research Stipends
The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library
Saint John’s University
Collegeville, Minnesota 56321

Heckman Stipends, made possible by the A.A. Heckman Endowed Fund, are awarded semi-annually. Up to 10 stipends in amounts up to $2,000 are available each year. Funds may be applied toward travel to and from Collegeville, housing and meals at Saint John’s University, and costs related to duplication of HMML’s microfilm or digital resources. The Stipend may be supplemented by other sources of funding but may not be held simultaneously with another HMML Stipend or Fellowship. Holders of the Stipend must wait at least two years before applying again.

The program is specifically intended to help scholars who have not yet established themselves professionally and whose research cannot progress satisfactorily without consulting materials to be found in the collections of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library.

Applications: Applications must be submitted by April 15 for residencies between July and December of the same year, or by November 15 for residencies between January and June of the following year.

Applicants are asked to provide:

  • a letter of application with current contact information, the title of the project, length of the proposed residency at HMML and its projected dates, and the amount requested (up to $2,000)
  • a description of the project to be pursued, with an explanation of how HMML’s resources are essential to its successful completion of the project; applicants are advised to be as specific as possible about which resources will be needed (maximum length: 1,000 words)
  • an updated curriculum vitae
  • a confidential letter of recommendation to be sent directly to HMML by an advisor, thesis director, mentor, or, in the case of postdoctoral candidates, a colleague who is a good judge of the applicant's work

Please send all materials as email attachments to: fellowships@hmml.org, with “Heckman Stipend” in the subject line.

Questions about the Stipends may be sent to the same address.

Hill Museum & Manuscript Library | Saint John’s University P.O. Box 7300 | 2835 Abbey Plaza | Collegeville, MN 56321 | Phone: 320-363-2741 | Fax: 320-363-3222 | www.hmml.org

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British Library -- New Digitisation Project and Positions in the Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts Section

See this link for more information.


CALLS FOR PAPERS (CONFERENCES)

44th Annual Cleveland Symposium
Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio
Friday, October 26, 2018

Call for Papers

"Built Environments and Performances of Power"

Current graduate students and recent graduates in art history and related disciplines are invited to submit a 350-word abstract and a CV for consideration to clevelandsymposium@gmail.com by June 29, 2018.

See here for more information.

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Thirty-Eighth Annual Harvard Celtic Colloquium
Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
October 5-7, 2018

Call for Papers

The Harvard Department of Celtic Languages & Literatures cordially invites proposals for papers on topics which relate directly to Celtic studies or Celtic languages and literatures in any phase; and papers on relevant cultural, historical or social science topics, theoretical perspectives, etc. for the 38thAnnual Harvard Celtic Colloquium. Papers concerning interdisciplinary research with a Celtic focus are also invited.
 
The colloquium will take place at Harvard University on 5-7 October 2018.
 
Attendance is free. Presentations should be no longer than twenty minutes, with a short discussion period after each paper. Papers given at the Colloquium may later be submitted for consideration by the editorial committee for publication in the Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium.
 
Potential presenters should submit a 200-250 word abstract and a brief biographical sketch. Submissions should be sent by e-mail to hcc@fas.harvard.edu. Please send submissions in the body of the email or as an attached Word Document.  

Abstracts due May 1st, 2018
 
Further information available at our website: http://www.hcc.fas.harvard.edu

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Government and Governance from Late Antiquity to the Renaissance: Representation and Reality 
45th Annual New England Medieval Conference
University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH
Saturday, 17 November, 2018

Keynote Speakers:

  • Amy Appleford (Boston University), “Governing Bodies in Late Medieval London”
  • Jonathan Lyon (University of Chicago), “Was There a Difference between Lordship and Governance in Late Medieval Germany?”

The New England Medieval Consortium seeks abstracts for papers that consider questions and problems inherent in organizing sophisticated societies from late antiquity through the Renaissance. Submissions are welcome from all fields of scholarly study including but not limited to history, literature, philosophy, theology, numismatics, art history, and manuscript studies. Government and governance are understood for the purposes of this conference to include all aspects of human organization from neighborhood associations and guilds to kingdoms and empires, and from parishes and priories to the papacy. Possible areas of inquiry include corruption, patronage, ethics, reform, institutional structures, bureaucracy, propaganda, jurisdiction, rights, and obligations.

Please send an abstract of 250 words and a CV to David Bachrach (David.Bachrach@unh.edu) via email attachment. Abstracts are due by 21 July, 2018.


CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS (JOURNALS)

Exploring Space in the Middle Ages
2018 Medieval Association of the Midwest Conference
Purdue University
October 4-6, 2018

We invite submissions of abstracts (c. 250 words) for the 2018 Medieval Association of the Midwest Conference, to be held at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, October 4-6, 2018.

The Middle Ages are broadly perceived conceptually in the cultural imagination, as occupying a place “in the middle” of bookend periods. The perception, recognition, and analysis of space in relation to this period of time covers a wide range of topics, including, but not restricted to:

  • Space and nation
  • Space, place and identity
  • Extra-terrestrial space
  • The Body in space
  • Cartography
  • Space beyond the senses
  • Digital humanities projects involving space
  • Occupying space
  • Textual space
  • Sound and space in the context of acoustics
  • Medievalisms: creating a new medieval space

We also welcome abstracts on topics which are not directly related to the theme of the conference.

Please send abstracts, queries, and questions, to MAM2018.Purdue@gmail.com by May 15, 2018.

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Estudios de Historia de España
Instituto de Historia de España of Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina

Estudios de Historia de España, biannual online magazine of the Instituto de Historia de España of Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina, calls to the academic community to submit their articles, monographics and book reviews.

The proposals, adapted to the publication rules attached will be topic and subject free, and may refer to the Spanish history and culture in their various eras and from all disciplines and perspectives; accepted languages: Spanish, Portuguese, English and French.

For more information, see here.

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Symposia: The Journal of Religion
University of Toronto

University of Toronto's Symposia: The Journal of Religion is issuing an open call for papers for the special 10th anniversary edition of the journal. Articles from all disciplines addressing religion and religious studies are welcome. We also invite book reviews and op-eds related topics in religious studies. All submissions are subject to a double-blind peer review process and this edition of the journal is set to be published in autumn of 2018. 

Please contact us with any questions regarding the journal or your submission, and consult our website for submission details and formatting requirements: http://symposia.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/symposia/about

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New Feminist Voices in the Heroic Age
Call for Papers for The Heroic Age special issue (2018)
Guest Editors: Melissa Ridley Elmes (Lindenwood University) and Mary Kate Hurley (Ohio University)

The Heroic Age, a digital peer-reviewed journal, seeks submissions for a special issue on “New Feminist Voices in the Heroic Age” which will run from 1 January 2018 through 31 December 2018.

We are accepting submissions from graduate students, postdoctoral, and junior or early-stage scholars (pre-tenure or equivalent NTT faculty experience) working in any discipline with a focus on Northwestern Europe in the period covered by the journal, c. 300-1200 CE.; we will also consider comparative approaches that examine a Northwestern European topic against another geographical area. We welcome articles of 7,000 words (inclusive of bibliography and endnotes) and essays of 3,000 words. Submissions do not necessarily have to focus on feminist issues, although they should demonstrate a feminist approach (women’s studies, gender/ queer studies, & etc.) to the question(s) being addressed.

Submission guidelines and style requirements for The Heroic Age can be found here.The Heroic Age operates on a rolling submissions basis, and the submissions period for 2018 is now open. Queries are welcome if you are unsure as to whether your project is suitable for this issue, and queries, article, and essay submissions should be sent to the guest editors: MElmes@lindenwood.edu and hurleym1@ohio.edu.

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Manuscript Studies: A Journal of the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies
Call for Journal Submissions

Manuscript Studies: A Journal of the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies aims to bring together scholarship from around the world and across disciplines related to the study of pre-modern manuscript books and documents. This peer-reviewed journal is open to contributions that rely on both traditional methodologies of manuscript study and those that explore the potential of new ones. We publish articles that engage in a larger conversation on manuscript culture and its continued relevance in today’s world and highlight the value of manuscript evidence in understanding our shared cultural and intellectual heritage. Studies that incorporate digital methodologies to further understanding of the physical and conceptual structures of the manuscript book are encouraged. A separate section, entitled Annotations, features research in progress and digital project reports.

If you are interested in proposing a special issue for 2018 and beyond, please contact Lynn Ransom, Managing Editor.

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Arcanum Special Issue: Hidden Esoteric Motifs and Spirituality in the Literature of the Middle Ages.

An invitation has been extended for manuscripts for a special issue of the journal Arcanum with the title, Hidden Esoteric Motifs and Spirituality in the Literature of the Middle Ages.

The goal of the special issue is to make a case for a renewed interest in scholarly research and a reappraisal of traditional interpretations of the literary works in the period.

See this page for more information.


CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENTS  

Announcing the Premodern Studies Seminar
Proposal Deadline: June 1, 2018

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is pleased to announce a new scholarly seminar: the Premodern Studies Seminar. This seminar will provide a forum for new approaches to medieval and early modern studies. Scholars from a range of disciplines will share work-in-progress on the inaugural theme of "what is the premodern?" The aim is to explore how presumptions of a rupture between the past and the present have shaped scholarship across the humanities and social sciences, and to consider how the interests and characteristics of premodern cultures reflect on, or even connect to, our own. We welcome submissions on these questions from all fields of premodern studies. Global approaches are particularly welcome, and we invite work that is at once archival and theoretical. Papers will be pre-circulated, so that the majority of the seminar session will be devoted to discussion.

The Premodern Studies Seminar Call for Proposals for 2018-19 seminars is now OPEN. Proposals for 2018-2019 will be accepted until June 1, 2018. We encourage papers that draw upon the Newberry collection. In addition to a classroom seminar format, presenters may request a hands-on workshop with original materials from the collection; please indicate interest in this option in your proposal.

To submit a proposal, visit our webform (http://www.newberry.org/seminar-proposal-form) and upload a one-page proposal (200 words), a list of Newberry materials related to your research, a statement explaining the relationship of the paper to your other work, and a brief CV.

For more information about the seminar, visit http://www.newberry.org/premodern-studies-seminar.

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Genealogies of Modernity
Collegium Institute, University of Pennsylvania
June 11-15, 2018

When and how did we become modern?  Or is modernity a fiction, both of the past and present?  Genealogies of Modernity is an interdisciplinary seminar launched last summer (GenMod I) to interrogate the role of the "age of reform" (roughly 1350-1600) in influential genealogical accounts of the modern world, and also to explore competing movements within that same age that might expand our imagination for life in our own.  In its next iteration this summer, GenMod II, we will extend our investigation into accounts of the Enlightenment, connecting them back to the age of reform and ahead to the present era.

The first four days of the five-day seminar will be led by different faculty specialists focusing on a specific genealogy in their own disciplines – history, philosophy, theology, literary studies, art history, and music.  The final day offers grad participants an opportunity to reflect on the week’s themes through the lens of their own work.  Graduate students across the humanities, whether they are new to the project or returning from last summer’s seminar, are welcome to apply.

For more information on the seminar and applications, see this page.

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Wycliffism and Hussitism: Contexts, Methods, Perspectives

St. Anne's College, Oxford

May 23-25, 2018

This 3-day conference, bringing together scholars from Oxford, Prague, and other academic centres, will explore the complex relationships between Wycliffite and Hussite thinking and textual production. This is a major topic of transnational interdisciplinary research. The conference will have a primary focus on two key aspects of Wycliffite and Hussite thought. First, their location in a pan-European landscape of religious and intellectual controversy, from England in the west to Bohemia and Poland in the east. Second, on questions of methodology: i.e. the philosophical, exegetical, textual-critical and other scholarly methods that Wycliffites and Hussites developed, defined, appropriated and critiqued in the course of their endeavour to produce a range of learned and quasi-learned texts, in Latin as well as in vernacular tongues.

The conference will therefore address the following themes while bearing the above foci in mind: intellectual history; philosophy of language; Wegestreit; impact on intellectual life and on universities; methods in exegesis and eschatology; Biblical translation and translation of other learned discourses; interaction of learned and ‘quasi-learned’ discourses; devotional and other reading for the laity; international contexts/ exchanges/ synergies, especially the Councils of Constance and Basel; public intellectuals and the role of the theological magisterium; the transfer of Wycliffite and Hussite ideas across Europe; anti-Hussite polemics; afterlife of conciliar and other condemnations

For the draft programme, click here.

Organisers: Kantik Ghosh (Oxford); Pavel Soukup (Prague); Mishtooni Bose (Oxford); Elizabeth Solopova (Oxford)

Registration click here.

A few graduate bursaries will be available to cover the registration fee.  Please contact Kantik Ghosh (kantik.ghosh@trinity.ox.ac.uk) and Pavel Soukup (soukup@flu.cs.cz) no later than April 15 with a statement of interest. 

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Aquinas on Divine Attributes

Mount Saint Mary College

June 14-17 2018

 

If you are interested in applying for a graduate scholarship for this event, please send a copy of your current CV to jeanne.conboy@msmc.edu.

 

The online registration for this workshop will start on January 16, 2018 and will close on or before May 7, 2018.  Please do not wait to register, the seating fills up fast. You may register on our website: www.msmc.edu/cdi

 

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact Jeanne Conboy.

 

2018 Workshop Poster

 

2018 Workshop Brochure

 


MISCELLANEOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS

Newberry Library
Center for Renaissance Studies

 

Extended Deadline: Fall 2018 Graduate Programming

 

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is excited to announce that the application

period for graduate programming for the fall term of the 2018-2019 academic year has been extended.

The application deadline for all fall programs is now May 15, 2018. See the links below for further
information on the programs and how to apply.

 

Workshops

 

Dante Between Philology and Philosophy

https://www.newberry.org/09082018-dante-between-philology-and-philosophy

Led by William Franke, Vanderbilt University; and Justin Steinberg, University of Chicago

Saturday, September 8, 2018

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

 

Physical and Virtual Emblematica

https://www.newberry.org/09292018-physical-and-virtual-emblematica

Led by Mara Wade, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Saturday, September 29, 2018

9:30 am - 1:00 pm

 

Unlocking Medieval Primary Sources

https://www.newberry.org/10122018-unlocking-medieval-primary-sources

Led by Karen Christianson and Christopher Fletcher, Newberry Library

Friday, October 12, 2018

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

 

Exploring Early Modern Maps

https://www.newberry.org/11162018-exploring-early-modern-maps

Led by Jim Akerman, Newberry Library

Friday, November 16, 2018

 

 

Seminars

 

Dissertation Seminar for Scholars of the History of the Book in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

https://www.newberry.org/10052018-2018-dissertation-seminar-scholars-history-book-medieval-and-early-modern-europe

Directed by Adam Hooks, University of Iowa; and Michael Johnston, Purdue University

October 5November 30, 2018February 22April 26, 2019

9:30 am - 12:30 pm

 

Digital Humanities and Premodern Studies: An Introduction

https://www.newberry.org/09272018-digital-humanities-and-premodern-studies-introduction

Led by Isabella Magni and Christopher Fletcher, Newberry Library

Thursdays, 2:00 pm -  5:00 pm, September 30-December 6, 2018

 

~

 

The Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies

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Heckman Research Stipends
Saint John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota

Heckman Stipends, made possible by the A.A. Heckman Endowed Fund, are awarded semi-annually. Up to 10 stipends in amounts up to $2,000 are available each year. Funds may be applied toward travel to and from Collegeville, housing and meals at Saint John’s University, and costs related to duplication of HMML’s microfilm or digital resources. The Stipend may be supplemented by other sources of funding but may not be held simultaneously with another HMML Stipend or Fellowship. Holders of the Stipend must wait at least two years before applying again. 

The program is specifically intended to help scholars who have not yet established themselves professionally and whose research cannot progress satisfactorily without consulting materials to be found in the collections of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library.

Applications: 
Applications must be submitted by April 15 for residencies between July and December of the same year, or by November 15 for residencies between January and June of the following year.

Applicants are asked to provide:

  • a letter of application with current contact information, the title of the project, length of the proposed residency at HMML and its projected dates, and the amount requested (up to $2,000)
  • a description of the project to be pursued, with an explanation of how HMML’s resources are essential to its successful completion of the project; applicants are advised to be as specific as possible about which resources will be needed (maximum length: 1,000 words)
  • an updated curriculum vitae
  • a confidential letter of recommendation to be sent directly to HMML by an advisor, thesis director, mentor, or, in the case of postdoctoral candidates, a colleague who is a good judge of the applicant's work

Please send all materials as email attachments to: fellowships@hmml.org, with “Heckman Stipend” in the subject line. Questions about the Stipends may be sent to the same address.

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Summer Course at Notre Dame: Patristic and Byzantine Greek
June 18-July 27th 2018

See this PDF for more information.

Questions? Contact Nick Churik (nchurik@nd.edu).

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8-Week Intensive Greek and Latin Summer School
University College Cork, Ireland
June 18 – August 9, 2018

For the 19th year running, the Department of Classics at UCC offers an intensive 8-week summer school for beginners with parallel courses in Latin and Ancient Greek. The courses are primarily aimed at postgraduate students in diverse disciplines who need to acquire a knowledge of either of the languages for further study and research, and at teachers whose schools would like to reintroduce Latin and Greek into their curriculum. Undergraduate students are more than welcome to apply as well. The basic grammar will be covered in the first 6 weeks and a further 2 weeks will be spent reading original texts.

See this PDF for more information.

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California Rare Book School: History of the Book, Live Online

The History of the Book, a freely available course book based materials in UCLA’s Special Collections is now live online: http://hob.gseis.ucla.edu

The project is meant to be a pedagogical resource—serving as an introductory overview, but also, as an ongoing project of classes taught in the Information Studies Department. Students will be invited to contribute to the project over time, building an extensive resource for study in this field as well as aggregation of resources for research. Chapters can be printed as pdf or read online. Exhibits exist only online.

The History of the Book is a networked resource focused on the production and reception of materials related to the history of the book and literacy technologies, broadly conceived. This ongoing project is being developed by Professor Johanna Drucker, working with staff and students based at UCLA to provide an online environment for research and learning. The project is pedagogical in its aims, but also, in its method. Some of the exhibit materials were developed by students in the MLIS program in Information Studies at UCLA, and some by faculty or research scholars. We have partners in other institutions, and welcome queries and contributions to the development of this site ahead. In this beta version, we are introducing three exhibits and an outline for what will be a coursebook for an introductory series of lessons. We have made every effort to proof and check the content, but if you find errors of fact or judgment, we would very much appreciate your contacting us with suggestions for correction.

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The Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Saint Louis University is pleased to report that the latest issue of Manuscripts on My Mind, no. 23, January 2018, is now available to be accessed on the journal's website. See back issues here.

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California Rare Book School
UCLA Department of Information Studies
Los Angeles, CA
July 31 – August 4, August 7-11, August 14-18, 2018

In addition to the long-standing offerings of the CalRBS, two courses are taking place the week of August 14-18 in the San Francisco Bay Area: "Printing at the Margins: A History of Women Printers" (Mills College, Oakland) taught by Kathleen Walkup and "History of Maps" (Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley) by Julie Sweetkind-Singer. A limited number of scholarships are available.

See their website for a full listing of their upcoming courses. Visit their admissions page in order to apply.

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Medieval Institute Publications, The University Press at Kalamazoo

The November 2017 issue of Medieval Institute Publications (Kalamazoo) is now available online.

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Authority and Innovation in Early Franciscan Thought (c. 1220-45)
Grant Agreement 714427-INNOVATION
January 1, 2017- December 31, 2021

‘Authority and Innovation in Early Franciscan Thought (c. 1220-45)’ (short-titled ‘INNOVATION’) is a 5-year research project that is funded by the European Research Council, the research funding body of the European Union. The director (‘Principal Investigator’) of the project is Dr Lydia Schumacher, who is based in the Department of Theology & Religious Studies at King’s College London. Her research staff includes Dr. Dominique Poirel and Dr Ana Irimescu, who are based at the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Paris, France.

The research team welcomes inquiries from those with interests in the early Franciscan intellectual tradition or any matter related to it. There are a variety of options for getting involved with the project or keeping updated on the team’s research.

For the schedule of workshops and full announcement, see the PDF flyer.  Contact Lydia Schumacher with any questions.

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Publication Announcement from Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press is thrilled to announce the publication of Mapping English Metaphor Through Time. Edited by Wendy Anderson, Ellen Bramwell, and Carole Hough, all in English Language & Linguistics at the University of Glasgow, the volume is one of the main outputs of the AHRC-funded project Mapping Metaphor with the Historical Thesaurus. The volume contains case studies of the development of metaphor in selected semantic domains, from the earliest stages of English to the present day. It includes contributions by Old English specialists such as Carole Biggam, Toni Healey, Carole Hough, Daria Izdebska, Christian Kay, Andrew Prescott and Jane Roberts.

For further description and contents, visit this page.

Enter promotional code AAFLYG6 for a 30% discount on online orders at OUP.com.

As of August 25, the publication is available in the UK and Europe; it should be available in the US in late October.

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Medieval Clothing and Textiles 12, edited by Robin Netherton and Gale R. Owen-Crocker, is now available for order

The best new research on medieval clothing and textiles, drawing from a range of disciplines. 

The studies collected here range through art, artifacts, documentary text, and poetry, addressing both real and symbolic functions of dress and textiles. John Block Friedman breaks new ground with his article on clothing for pets and other animals, while Grzegorz Pac compares depictions of sacred and royal female dress and evaluates attempts to link them together. Jonathan C. Cooper describes the clothing of scholars in Scotland's three pre-Reformation universities and the effects of the Reformation upon it. Camilla Luise Dahl examines references to women's garments in probates and what they reveal about early modern fashions. Megan Cavell focuses on the treatment of textiles associated with the Holy of Holies in Old English biblical poetry. Frances Pritchard examines the iconography, heraldry, and inscriptions on a worn and repaired set of embroidered fifteenth-century orphreys to determine their origin. Finally, Thomas M. Izbicki summarizes evidence for the choice of white linen for the altar and the responsibilities of priests for keeping it clean and in good repair.

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Scriptorium no. 9 is now available, published by the Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina.

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Les Enluminures is pleased to announce its Blog on Medieval Text Manuscripts. We are known for our complete scholarly descriptions of all the manuscripts on our text manuscripts site (www.textmanuscripts.com), but often we have even more to say, and our new blog gives us a place to say it. We explore what these books can tell us about who made them and used them. We delve into their fascinating and unusual contents. Some of our discoveries are quite significant, some merely amusing, and some bizarre. Bring your curiosity; we think you'll find the posts instructive (and lots of fun). Do you want to read about Books of Hours? Then turn to “Medieval Must-Haves,” “Reading the Hours,” and “Bringing the Past Alive.” “Dead Men in the Margins” investigates marginal drawings, “When Coats of Arms Wore Many Hats” is a look at medieval heraldry, and “Dreaming the Middle Ages,” the nineteenth-century neo-Gothic. Manuscripts intersect with modern enjoyment (“Beer is made by men, wine by God” reveals some medieval wine regulations that might surprise you) and fears (“Deluge of Doom” contemplates a weather catastrophe and the panic it inspired). Authors of the blogs include Emily Runde, Laura Light, Sandra Hindman, and Christopher de Hamel. 

Our manuscripts go to homes near and far, and we love to hear about the stories they inspire in their new homes. Guest posts are welcome (a current post discusses an acquisition by the University of Sydney and a future one features a manuscript at the University of California at Los Angeles). Follow our Blog on Medieval Text Manuscripts

Information:
sandrahindman@lesenluminures.com
lauralight@lesenluminures.com

Les Enluminures is a global business devoted to the buying and selling of medieval manuscripts.  It maintains locations in New York, Paris, and Chicago, and representation as well in Boston and London.

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The Project Team: Writing Culture in Southern German Women's Convents

'Writing Culture in Southern German Women's Convents' was the focus of a project funded from September 2008 until May 2012 by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) as part of its action plan on 'Libraries and Archives in Cooperation with Research'. This programmatic new approach made possible the cataloguing, digitisation and academic study of medieval manuscripts and early printed books as well as of pragmatic documents and archival records from five selected southern German women's convents.

Jointly organised by the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich and the Bayerisches Hauptstaatsarchiv, the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität in Münster / Heinrich-Heine-Universität in Düsseldorf, the project studied the medieval books of these Bavarian convents and their archival holdings (until 1550) and now presents them embedded in their historical context. The manuscripts, archival records and incunables created or formerly owned by the Dominican sisters of Altenhohenau, the Bridgettines of Altomünster, the Poor Clares (St. Jakob am Anger) and Franciscan Tertiaries (Pütrichhaus) of Munich and the Benedictines of Neuburg an der Donau allowed systematic insights into the convent libraries, economic management and the particular roles of office holders. More broadly the project offered new perspectives on the education, internal organisation and the self-conception of these religious communities.

After the dissolution of these houses the historical records were divided up and as a result, books and documents are today preserved in libraries as well as in archives. It was therefore crucial to bring them back together under an overall perspective. Through a synthesis of the source material, the rich heritage of these often highly-educated women and their engagement with literature can be assessed and presented in an unprecedented way, within the wider context of these politically and economically influential communities.

When the project expired, the project partner provided in-house effort for the publication of the results. The documents have been recently made accessible online as well as in a printed catalogue.

A thematic research archive hosted by the Bayerische Landesbibliothek Online offers introductory texts and an overview of the mediaeval holdings,structured by subject groups based on mediaeval ways of organising libraries and knowledge, to allow comparisons, despite the different quantity of sourcematerial from each convent. Links provide direct access to the digitised manuscripts, early printed books, documents and archival records. Manuscript descriptions are available online.

The printed catalogue contains introductory material and detailed descriptions of the manuscripts from two of the convents as well as an overview of the printed material:
Katalog der lateinischen Handschriften der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek München. Die Handschriften aus den Klöstern Altenhohenau und Altomünster: Clm 2901-2966 sowie Streubestände gleicher Provenienz, Anja Freckmann, Juliane Trede and Elisabeth Wunderle, eds, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2016.

Melanie Hömberg's study of the economic practices of the female communities, 'Economic Book Keeping in Context', is available on the homepage through a link. Almut Breitenbach's publications are listed in the bibliography.

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Digitisation

Three 8-9th C. Irish manuscripts have recently been digitised and the images provided free online. The work is part of the Early Irish Manuscripts Project at Trinity College Dublin. 

At the end of the first paragraph in each of the following descriptive webpages, there is a link to the digitized manuscript images:

1.   Garland of Howth (TCD MS 56):

2.   Book of Mulling (TCD MS 60): 

3.   Book of Dimma (TCD MS 59):

The Early Irish MS Project is currently digitising the Codex Usserianus Primus (TCD MS 55). You can read more about that here.

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Now available: Colleen E. Donnelly, The Marys of Medieval Drama. The Middle English Digby and N-town in Translation (Sidestone, June 2016). 

Mary Magdalene and the Virgin Mary continue to intrigue and fascinate us to this day. Their appearances in the Bible are brief, piquing our curiosity and compelling speculation about the unknown years of their lives. This volume contains modern translations of plays performed during the late Middle Ages in England about the lives of the Virgin Mary and Mary. These plays provide a link between canonical Scripture, apocryphal and gnostic materials from the first centuries of Christianity that survived secreted or in oral tradition, legendary materials that developed over the ensuing centuries, and contemporary medieval religious belief and practices.

Materials from the N-Town Mary and other plays contain episodes about the childhood of the Virgin, her betrothal and marriage to Joseph, and her time after the death of Christ. The Digby Mary Magdalene begins with an account of the death of Mary Magdalene’s father’s death, her subsequent fall into promiscuity, her redemption, her journey to convert Marseille and thus Christianize France, her later years as a hermit and her death. These plays illustrate one way in which Biblical materials were available to lay people before the printing of the Bible. Reading these plays of the Virgin Mary and Mary Magdalene from the late Middle Ages increases our understanding of the history of the Marian and Magdalene traditions practiced in earlier centuries, as well as our understanding of what these women have come to represent today, shedding light on how their images have shaped the roles for women in the Church.

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Now available: Stephen Harris, Bede and Aethelthryth: An Introduction to Christian Latin Poetics (West Virginia University Press, April 2016). Bede and Aethelthryth asks why Christians in Britain around the year 700 enjoyed Latin poetry. What did they see in it? What did they get from it? This book attempts to reconstruct the horizon of expectation of a highly learned, Latin-speaking nun as she encounters a fifty-line poem by the Venerable Bede, the Hymn to AethelthrythRead more on the publisher's website. 

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Now available as volume 51 of the Anglia Book Series is The Old English Gloss to the Lindisfarne Gospels: Language, Author and Context (ed. Julia Fernández Cuesta and Sara M. Pons-Sanz). It is a multifaceted collection of articles on the interlinear gloss to the Lindisfarne Gospels by leading experts in their fields, namely Christine Bolze, Stewart Brookes, Michelle P. Brown, Paul Cavill, Marcelle Cole, Julia Fernández Cuesta, Luisa García García, Karen Jolly, Tadashi Kotake, Mª Nieves Rodríguez Ledesma, Patrizia Lendinara, Robert McColl Millar, Sara M. Pons-Sanz, Jane Roberts, Philip G. Rusche and George Walkden (for details, see the List of Contents). For members of ISAS, De Gruyter offers a 20% discount. 

For more on the Anglia /Anglia Book Series, see:
http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/angl
https://www.degruyter.com/view/serial/36292

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Medieval Academy Newsletter

News items can be read on the MAA blog.

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Facsimile of Moore Bede Released

ISAS colleagues will be pleased to know that Cambridge University Library has released a full digital facsimile of the Moore Bede (CUL Kk.5.16) which is — almost certainly — the earliest copy of Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum made not so very long after Bede's death in 735. 

The direct link to the facsimile is here: http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/view/MS-KK-00005-00016/1 

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Lambeth Palace Library Greek MS Descriptive Catalogue is now freely accessible online:

http://www.lambethpalacelibrary.org/content/greek

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Journal Issue Online

The open access version of the medieval journal published by the French School in Rome (Mélanges de l’École française de Rome. Moyen Âge, 129.1, 2017) is now available online: http://mefrm.revues.org/

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Digitization project: Codex Eyckensis and a 10th century Gospel Book digitized by the Museums Department of Maaseik in Belgium
Press Release: Codex Eyckensis

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The Sciola Grant for Research in Italy

Sponsored by the Diana M. Sciola Endowment for Excellence to support research on Catholic Tradition and Italian Artistic Culture

The Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts (ISLA) invites those undergraduates and graduate students in all Arts and Letters disciplines whose research interests address the impact of Catholic traditions upon Italian artistic culture to submit proposals to the Sciola Grant Program.  In order to be eligible for funding, research must take place in Italy. The Sciola Family Endowment supports projects that study the various ways in which the Catholic tradition has influenced the visual arts, theatre, architecture, fashion, music, cinema, literature, design, culinary arts and photography throughout the ages. 

A double-spaced, 3-page proposal, budget, and a letter of recommendation are required of both undergraduates and graduates. Proposals should make clear the connection between Catholic tradition and the artistic expression under study.

For details concerning the submission of applications as well as post-grant requirements, see UROP Proposal Requirements for Academic Year & Summer Submissions. Undergraduates must upload their application materials to UrApply  (including health form and parental consent); graduate students should email their completed applications, along with a Sciola Grant Proposal Cover Sheet, to Therese Blacketor

See Grant Post-Award Requirements for the required final report guidelines.

Maximum award $2,500. Proposals accepted on a rolling basis.

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Loveden Hill Urn 3D model now online

Colleagues with research and teaching interests in early Old English, runeology, material culture, archaeology, or digital humanities, may be interested in a small project on the Loveden Hill cremation urn which has just been completed by colleagues in Leicester and Nottingham (Martin Findell), with Dominic Powlesland (The Landscape Research Centre) and the generous support of the Trustees of the British Museum and the Museum's Department of Britain, Europe and Prehistory. 

Using digital photogrammetry, Dominic has created a dynamic 3D model of this 6th C cremation urn, which carries one of the earliest examples of written Old English, in runic script. The module is hosted on the British Museum's Sketchfab site and is free and accessible to all. You can view it at 3 resolutions, (LD, SD, HD – low, standard, high), and the files are small enough for you to view it in HD on your mobile phone (something to impress even your high-tech students). Annotations have been provided, but you can switch these off using the tools in the lower right hand corner of the screen.

The short URL to the site is here: https://skfb.ly/IYCq 

The model allows you to rotate the pot, as if you were holding it – which is what you need to do to read the inscription, and – indeed – to have written it in the first place. The model should therefore enable a more sophisticated contextual analysis of the inscription than hitherto possible, alongside the linguistic and graphic analysis of the runes (indeed, this will form part of Martin Findell's forthcoming book, arising from his Impact of Diasporas project). The potential of this type of technology for creating and sharing research and teaching tools is plain to see.   

Dominic, Martin and I have written a blog for those of you interested in the methods used to create the model, and for more information about the pot and the inscription. This can be found on the LRC website: http://www.landscaperesearchcentre.org/wp/?p=92 . Here you can also download two PDF files. These contain scaleable, dynamic versions of the model, so that you can measure it, create cross sections, and use the model off-line.

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Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources now freely available online

The project is delighted to announce that the text of the DMLBS has been made available under license to the Logeion project hosted by the University of Chicago and is now accessible via the Logeion interface at http://logeion.uchicago.edu/.

The Logeion interface, which does not require a subscription of any kind, allows searching of all its many dictionaries by headword. (More advanced forms of searching across the DMLBS text are available via the subscription-based Brepolis.net platform.) We very much hope that this new way of accessing the dictionary will be appreciated by medieval scholars across the world. We would, of course, encourage users nevertheless to buy a copy of the printed dictionary as well!

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Newberry Library French Renaissance Paleography Project now online. 


A self-help tool that provides integrated access to an archive of historically significant, visually captivating manuscripts held in the collection of the Newberry Library and other North American repositories. Via interactive maps, faceted browsing, and keyword searches, users can explore more than 100 French manuscript documents written between 1300 and 1700, page through a dozen historical calligraphy books, view a half-dozen historical maps, practice transcribing the documents, and more. 

https://paleography.library.utoronto.ca/ 

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British Library Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts Digitisation Master List (1429 items) now online : http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/files/bl-amem-digitised-manuscripts-master-list.pdf

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The Utrecht Psalter Online

UPsalter

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The Gothic Ivories Project, the Courtauld Institute

The Snite Museum of Art at the University of Notre Dame has recently contributed works to the collection of Gothic ivories assembled by the Courtauld Institute.

The entire project can be viewed here: Gothic Ivories Project, Courtauld

The Snite’s contributions can be viewed here: Snite Gothic Ivories

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Calendar of Saints in Byzantine Manuscripts and Frescoes

The Index of Christian Art, Princeton University

This is a new resource taken from the work of Lois Drewer, published posthumously. For more information, see the project’s website.

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The British Library: Digital Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts

The British Library has put many of its online manuscript images into the public domain.

Welcome to the Digital Catalogue